Aysel Küçüksu

GEM-STONES Doctoral Fellow

PhD POSITION IN EU LAW AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW ON "THE ROLE OF THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN FRAMING THE PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTIVE GLOBAL JUSTICE"

Host Institutions

Thesis Title

THE ROLE OF THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN FRAMING THE PRINCIPLES OF DISTRIBUTIVE GLOBAL JUSTICE

Research Abstract

With the current pace of globalization and borders’ decreasing relevance, issues of distributive global justice are moving outside the realm of hypothetical philosophical debates. Instead, they are becoming more directly relevant to policy-making, global governance, and the functioning of international institutions. The GEM-STONES research agenda seeks to place the European Union within this globalised world whilst keeping in mind its elaborate, one-of-a-kind structure. With the important international standing it has, the European Union must navigate the global scene aware of the significant implications its decisions will have on the international legal order. The role of the European Court of Justice then becomes one of paramount importance, as the coherence and unity of response across policy fields that it can enable are indispensable for the EU’s status as a global actor in this world of increasing complexity. Probing into the Court’s rhetorical presence and actions within the highly political sphere of distributive global justice, this research project aims to illuminate its framing capacity in the debate and subsequently explore its reliability as an avenue through which the EU can strengthen its position as a global actor.

Case-studies

The European Court of Justice

Societal Relevance

Both the academic and societal relevance of this endeavor are difficult to argue against. Whilst at the academic level, this research will be filling out a void in scholarship examining the interaction of the ECJ with the concept of justice in EU external relations, at the societal level, this research will show how, if at all, the ECJ can be seen as a vehicle to allow for the evolution of instruments of the EU, which, due to their temporal location or the political compromise they resulted from, might not be up to the spirit of the time. In that vein, the independence of the ECJ might even act as a cure to concerns that policy might, in certain cases, be too much of a hostage to the political process.

 

 

MOBILITY SCHEDULE

Nov 2016 – Sep 2017     University of Geneva, Switzerland
Oct 2017 – Aug 2019      LUISS-Guido Carli, Rome, Italy
Sep 2017 – Feb 2018     Istituto di Affari Internazionali (www.iai.it), Rome, Italy

DEGREES AND TITLES

Master’s Degree in Law (LLM)
University of Copenhagen, Denmark 2016
Bachelor’s degree in English and European Union Law (LLB)
Queen Mary, University of London, England 2015

WORK EXPERIENCE

2015 – 2016: Legal Research Assistant at iCourts, Centre of Excellence for International Courts, Copenhagen, Denmark

2015 – 2016: Volunteer Legal Counsilor at Refugees Welcome, Denmark

June 2015: Legal Intern at Nabas International Lawyers LLP, London, England

2014-2015: Student Legal Adviser at Queen Mary Legal Advice Centre, London, England

Awards And Scholarships

  • Languages Undergaduate of the Year Winner, EU Careers and TargetJobs 2015
  • Client Interviewing Competition Winner, Queen Mary University Law Society 2015
  • Expeditions Fund Awardee, Queen Mary Expeditions Fund 2014
  • Raise and Give Honours Award, Queen Mary Students Union 2012 and 2013
  • Silver Volunteering Award, Queen Mary Students Union 2012
  • Margaret R. Sanders Award for Student Life, American College of Sofia 2011
  • Merit-Based Scholarship Awardee: Yale IVY Scholars Program, Yale University 2010; and Oxford Tradition Summer School, Oxford University 2009

LanguageS

English (full working proficiency); Bulgarian (native); Turkish (bilingual); Danish (advanced); Spanish (intermediate); French (beginner).

Research Interests

  • International Courts
  • Global Justice
  • Human Rights
  • Refugee Rights
  • Legal Rhetoric

 

 

 

Olsen, Henrik Palmer and Aysel Küçüksu. ‘Finding Hidden Patterns in ECtHR’s Case Law: On How Citation Network Analysis Can Improve Our Knowledge of ECtHR’s Article 14 Practice’. International Journal of Discrimination and the Law, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2017.

This project has received funding from the European Union's horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No 722826.